Emergency Home Supply Kit

No one likes to think about a natural disaster but it's better to be prepared than overwhelmed if a major event causes havoc in your home. FEMA has suggestions to prepare, plan and stay informed so you're ready if disaster happens.

By Gene and Katie Hamilton

Emergency Home Supply Kit FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, knows more than a thing or two about disasters. Take the time to look at their list of basic disaster supplies to have on hand when there's a threat of major weather damage where you live. And have a discussion about where family members and your pets can meet if they are forced to leave their homes. And don't forget that cell phones (chargers included) play a major part in keeping everyone informed.

FEMA Basic Disaster Supplies Kit

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

Once you have gathered the supplies for a basic emergency kit, you may want to consider adding the following items:

  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food and extra water for your pet
  • Cash or traveler's checks and change
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt
  • For more information go to FEMA's https://www.ready.gov/

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